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The African Famine Revisited 2

AFRICAN FAMINE AND OUR MISSION:  

Our mission is to be the best in the world in micro hydro electric and water resource management: by evolving innovative damless hydroelectric and water transfer technology. We create Today’s Tall Tree Nurseries to support Micro Finance for women farmers and their families using the Carbon Tax Fund, a new form of foreign aid. We export  African Mechanization  for more productive agriculture and to fight famine.

African Famine

When the rains failed in 1984 it was 16 straight years of meagre rainfall, which was all too much. Most of the sub-Saharan Africa was affected including Ethiopia. The survival of 30 million Africans was in imminent risk. There was yet another crop failure in Northern and Western Sudan.

The lessons learned from these famines are tough ones: droughts are inevitable, while famine is not. It is far better to undertake development programs in advance of climate failure and the most economical use of scarce resources. This means a long term support to avert future tragedies.Untitled-1f

Part of the reason for this tragedy was the need for sustainable development as opposed to the practices of overgrazing and cutting down scarce trees for firewood, which turned fragile lands into near deserts. This evolved into a loss of productive land because of a loss of topsoil through erosion, which is very hard to reverse.

The solution to this problem of imminent climate change means a fundamental change to African economic life and behavior in order to arrest this vicious cycle of poverty. 

A Fundamental Change to African Economic Life

The foreseeable future in Africa is disorder either politically or environmentally. There is a great need for change. Although this destruction is morally repugnant to Africans, the destruction of our environment must be also addressed as an investment in our planet’s future including the stabilizing of carbon emissions.

 In economic terms the destruction of our great forests was historically only valued for their timber and the clearing of land for agriculture. Hence, there was no economic incentive to save the forests.

The Common Good Counts for Very Little.

The national interest used to be a shared value, but wherever you look today in most of Africa the rule of thumb in public life is personal gain – not public good. The common thread in all this is the complete lack of consideration for other people.

It starts with politicians, whether in government or opposition. People go into politics not to serve or make a difference, but line up their pockets. People who are in power or in a position of authority act in their own personal interests, regardless of the impact on others. This same attitude drives the politician who steals money that could be used for a hospital, school or to provide potable water, and stashes it abroad. There is little evidence that this attitude will change anytime soon.

The utter disregard for the larger interests of the country and the people is so embedded in the ruling class, it may take a mass revolt to redress. Africans are not known for staging popular revolts but that may their only salvation. In the meantime, there is a peaceful approach.

An Alternative More Peaceful Approach

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