Tag Archives: population growth

WATER RESOURCES IN HAITI SOLVED 2

Water Resources Haiti

Water resources in Haiti are a major concern.

The lack of adequate safe (potable) water supplies for basic human needs is a significant problem throughout Haiti, although surface and ground water resources are abundant. This situation leads to increased competition for limited resources. Several of the main reasons for this situation are:

  • uneven rainfall distribution;
  • degradation of the watersheds caused by deforestation;
  • rapid growth in urban areas with demand beyond capacity;
  • poor distribution networks;
  • poor water resources management;
  • no single agency responsible for management of water ;
  • lack of adequate data needed to make informed decisions;
  • poor irrigation supply network leading to underdevelopment; 
  • lack of wastewater  treatment and solid waste disposal.

Most of the streams are relatively small and less than 100 kilometers long. With each passing year, the rivers and streams flow more like torrents and less like stable permanent rivers. The largest natural lake in the country is Étang Saumâtre has no outlet, and contains brackish water. Many of the smaller natural lakes that exist throughout the country also contain brackish water. 

ABJECT POVERTY

About 54 percent of the population lives in abject poverty. Based on 1997 estimates, the unemployment rate in a work force of approximately 3.6 million is about 38 percent.

Only 61.7% of the population have jobs but these are the working poor as many make only $3.10 per day. Women are least likely to go to school or have a job. Violence against women is common with 22.8% of women reporting abuse – what of the abuse that goes unreported? Of course the issue of “restavek” children or child slavery persists despite national and international laws. It is a socially accepted norm to sell children ages 5-15 and to make then work for no pay, to deny them the opportunity to attend school and results in children being abused both physically and sexually.

In Cite Soleil – the largest slum in Haiti is 3 square miles and has about 200-300,000 people. Most are unemployed and the vast majority are children. In Haiti 65% of the people are under 25 years old. The children live in extreme hunger and are exposed to gang violence, high risk for HIV/AIDS, no opportunity for an education, no sewer system and rat infestations. On average – nine people live in one shack.

Most people who live in the slums state their biggest fear is violence – especially for women and girls (Haugen and Boutros, 2014). In the slums, this problem is rampant; acts of violence are intentionally hidden, legal protection is non-existent and violence keeps the poor from ever escaping poverty.

Port-au-Prince

Water supply for Port-au-Prince, the most populated area in Haiti, is poor. In 1995 only about 35 percent of the nearly 2.5 million inhabitants had access to the water system. Most receive water only twice a week. The lack of service is attributed to

  • system losses associated with the age of the distribution system and theft of service, estimated at 60 percent;
  •  interruptions in the power supply to the wells and pumps; and
  •  contamination of water sources.

Continue reading WATER RESOURCES IN HAITI SOLVED 2

Next Green Revolution 2

The Next Green Revolution

Science prevented the last food crisis. Can it save us again?

 

Africa’s cropland biome occupies ~38% of the photo synthetically active land area of the African continent (~19.8 M km2) and encompasses more than 90% of its rural population living in 54 countries.

Next Green RevolutionRegion of Interest

We must concentrate on the biomes of Africa that include forests and rangelands, but exclude deserts

Next Green Revolution

Overall Region of Interest

A big, risky decision for small holder farmers is what type and how much fertilizer to apply to their crops. There is lot of uncertainty about how the crops will respond, with a risk that the farmers will even lose when they harvest and sell the produce. Testing the soil beforehand and knowing how plants will respond can play an important role in reducing this risk. But the high cost and lack of access to testing services have been major bottlenecks for farmers in developing countries.

Low-Cost Soil AnalysisNext Green Revolution

Similarly, planners in governments, the private sector and non-governmental organizations who are working out what to supply to small holder farmers are also faced with large uncertainties on what types and combinations of inputs to supply and where, in relation to the local soils. For example, a number of agencies in Africa are designing fertilizer blending and liming programs and so need to know how strongly acid soils are and what soil micro nutrients may be limiting in different areas. Existing soil maps do not provide up-to-date information on specific soil properties that are needed to guide such decisions.

New advances in rapid, low-cost soil analytical techniques in the laboratory that simply measure light reflecting from a soil sample are reducing the cost of measuring soil properties. Soil infrared spectroscopy allows a soil sample to be scanned in just 30 seconds and the resulting fingerprint used to predict a number of soil properties based on calibration databases. And this costs just $1 compared with at least $100 using conventional soil testing methods. With the availability of satellite imagery and from space and now unmanned aerial vehicles at ever increasing spatial resolution (250 metres to sub-metre), it is becoming possible to make high resolution soil property maps at low cost.

Next Green Revolution

To successfully close the gap, we’ll need to adopt a variety of innovative strategies. We must produce more crops, while more efficiently using the food we already grow.

What are we to do?

Continue reading Next Green Revolution 2

Enough Food for the Future? 2

Is There Enough Food for the Future?world food crisis

The new UN climate report shows that crop yields already are being adversely affected by a changing climate, and how we respond globally in creating a more resilient food system is very important now. But we also recognize that food is central to our culture and is a source of great pleasure and comfort to people. We want to ensure we tackle all aspects so that we have enough food for the future.

world food crisis

The estimate of more than 9 billion people in less than 40 years highlights a stark challenge for the global food system.

We have enough food for the roughly 7 billion people alive today, but nearly a billion are hungry or malnourished, mostly due to poverty and unequal distribution. To feed those who are currently hungry—and the additional 2 billion-plus people who will live on the planet by 2050—our best projections are that crop production will need to increase between 60 and 100 percent. “Business as usual” could lead to a doubling of demand for agricultural production.

If the population is growing by less than one-third, why would the overall demand double? Simply stated: more people have more money.

Meeting the problem through production alone won’t be enough, and we should explore many alternatives that focus on reducing demand for food, like changing our diets and reducing food waste and loss. Increasing crop production can be part of the solution.

What drives the demand?

Continue reading Enough Food for the Future? 2

AFRICA: Future World Food Basket 2

AFRICA FUTURE & OUR  MISSION:  

Our mission is to be the best in the world in micro hydro electric and water resource management: by evolving innovative damless hydroelectric and water transfer technology. We create Today’s Tall Tree Nurseries to support Micro Finance for women farmers and their families using the Carbon Tax Fund, a new form of foreign aid. We export Mechanization into Africa for more productive agriculture for a Brighter Future in Africa.

ABYSMAL AFRICA

In contrast with Asia, which has seen huge increases in agricultural yields in the last 40 years, sub-Saharan Africa’s track record has been abysmal. Food production is actually 10% lower today than in 1960, yet over this time period the aggregate world food production has increased by 145%.

Climate change could push prices up by 130%. Rice tripled in price over a period of four months, wheat doubled and corn rose 46 per cent. This world food crisis of high grain import prices, on top of high fuel prices, has placed an acute economic squeeze on consumers in developing countries.

People move in search of better opportunities elsewhere and jobs!! The high rate of urban migration in Africa, particularly among young people, is largely because the rural economy – which is predominantly agrarian – has been stagnant. These young people are not fleeing from farming as an occupation. They are fleeing from poverty!!

AGRICULTURAL GOVERNMENT SPENDING

Agriculture can deliver 2-3 times the return on investment, in terms of improved economic well-being, as other sectors: it represents 32% of Africa’s GDP; and employs 65% of the working population. Most importantly, it is the sector where the poorest on the continent are most likely to be engaged in their struggle to survive. Some African countries’ improved economic performance over the last 10 to 15 years indicates that they do have the potential to become net exporters of food. If we transform the agriculture sector, we will transform the African continent!

The best part of two decades there has been a consensus on aid in Africa – namely that the state should not subsidize smallholder agriculture. Nearly 30 percent of World Bank lending once went to agricultural modernization, but now it is just 8 percent. China’s dramatic reduction of poverty has been achieved by growth primarily in the agricultural sector, not the industrial. Since the late 1970s, improvements in technology and infrastructure helped boost production in smallholder agriculture, with farmers’ incomes rising at more than 7% a year. The result is that 200 million small-scale farmers working an average of 0.6 hectare of land are now feeding a population of 1.3 billion.

The Maputo declaration of 2003 pledged African countries to 10% of government spending for agriculture. This took place at a conference of African Ministers for Agriculture, chaired a meeting at FAO headquarters. Thirteen years later, many African countries have not even reached 4%.

Malawi’s defied these teachings and put in place a series of policy measures that increased agricultural development and overall economic development at the cost of 16% of government spending.

LAND TENURE

During one of the biggest challenges is the issue of land tenure. It is difficult to negotiate adequate secure tenure and get permission from all of the relevant authorities. Living Water Microfinance Inc. has been focusing its efforts, especially for women, who generally are not allowed to own land.

The Gene Revolution: Africa Future

The Green Revolution of the 1960s and ’70s is now being overtaken by “the Gene Revolution” — the development and spread of GM crops across the world. The uptake of genetically modified (GM) crops is the fastest adoption rate of any crop technology, increasing from 1.7 million hectares in 1996 to 148 million hectares in 2010. The USDA says 94% of soy and 75% of all corn grown in the U.S. is genetically modified.

African countries such as South Africa, Burkina Faso and Egypt have adopted GM crops. Other countries such as Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania are preparing to start field trials. Farming giants like China, Brazil and India have embraced biotech crops. And even the European Commission (EC) is acknowledging that existing GM crops do not carry any unique risks. In a recent study, the EC has found that GM crops are at least as safe for consumers and the environment as conventionally bred plant varieties, and sometimes safer. It also concluded that GM crops could help developing countries meet their food needs while addressing the challenges of climate change in a sustainable way.

Africa is steadily joining the biotechnology revolution. South Africa’s GM crop production stood at 2.0 million hectares (4.94 million acres) in 2010.

GMO DISADVANTAGE

Anti-GMO activists are still engaged in stopping this GM effort. The European Parliament voted that calls on the G7 countries not to support the use of genetically modified (GMO) seeds in Africa, despite the dangers of food security and poverty levels on the continent. 

As reported in a New York Times article, the ridiculously high prices of seeds and pesticides are causing farmers to make less money than ever. Additionally, as pests and weeds become increasingly immune to insecticides, farmers have to spend more and more money on chemicals. And let’s not forget, they are also legally required to buy new seeds every season unless they want to be sued or forced to burn all their plants.

Currently, just three mega companies control over half of the global seed market, which has caused prices to skyrocket. For example, the average price of planting an acre of soybeans has gone up 325 percent since 1995.

So, If GMOs Aren’t the Answer…

Continue reading AFRICA: Future World Food Basket 2

Conscious Capitalism 2

CONSCIOUS CAPITALISM & OUR MISSION:  

Our mission is to be the best in the world in micro hydro electric and water resource management: by evolving innovative damless hydroelectric and water transfer technology. We create Today’s Tall Tree Nurseries to support Micro Finance for women farmers and their families using the Carbon Tax Fund, a new form of foreign aid. We export Mechanization into Africa for more productive agriculture. We do all this under the umbrella of Conscious Capitalism.

Conscious Capitalism

Africa is most affected by businesses than any other social organizations, bringing people together to help other people and bringing value and food for Africans – not entirely for profit but a by-product of a higher purpose.

Conscious businesses are a better way to do business. It will start slowly like a small path in the forest with a local cluster, but it will expand to a broad highway, because it lifts people out of poverty and creates prosperity. Partners of conscious businesses are dedicated to the company’s purposes. Our children and grandchildren will flourish in ways that we cannot imagine.Untitled-1c2

“Business as usual” will not succeed: we need a new paradigm for business: a conscious business, which have four tenets:

  1. A higher purpose of caring: why our business exists and why you were born
  2. Harmonious Integration of all stakeholders: including landlords, suppliers, the community and the environment. We wish to build partnerships that share our common purpose.
  3. Conscious Leadership: motivated by the firm’s higher purpose.
  4. Conscious Culture: to innovate continually

Living Water MicroFinance Inc. is a heroic conscious business because it creates value and lifts Africans out of their poverty, creates stability for the family and helps build communities with technical schooling. Not by crony capitalism where the select few use the coercive power of government for their advantage.

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Living Water MicroFinance’s Purpose

  • to evolve a more sustainable and efficient agricultural system using micro finance
  • to raise awareness of healthy eating
  • to help end poverty using irrigation and electricity
  • to make Conscious Business a dominant economic system

It is socially irresponsible to run a business that does not consistently generate profits, yet these are not the primary goals.

Africans feel more fulfilled when their work is more aligned with their passion: to help fellow Africans. Positions become available and careers are created through the collective intelligence of teamwork, where creative ideas of individuals are bounced around the team and get improved.

Plato discovered his ideals: the Good (service to others); the True (furthering human knowledge) and the Beautiful (excellence and the creation of beauty). We add a fourth: the Heroic (the courage to do the right thing to change and improve the world greater than most would think possible.

 Living Water Microfinance Conscious Capitalism

Continue reading Conscious Capitalism 2

The African Famine Revisited 2

AFRICAN FAMINE AND OUR MISSION:  

Our mission is to be the best in the world in micro hydro electric and water resource management: by evolving innovative damless hydroelectric and water transfer technology. We create Today’s Tall Tree Nurseries to support Micro Finance for women farmers and their families using the Carbon Tax Fund, a new form of foreign aid. We export  African Mechanization  for more productive agriculture and to fight famine.

African Famine

When the rains failed in 1984 it was 16 straight years of meagre rainfall, which was all too much. Most of the sub-Saharan Africa was affected including Ethiopia. The survival of 30 million Africans was in imminent risk. There was yet another crop failure in Northern and Western Sudan.

The lessons learned from these famines are tough ones: droughts are inevitable, while famine is not. It is far better to undertake development programs in advance of climate failure and the most economical use of scarce resources. This means a long term support to avert future tragedies.Untitled-1f

Part of the reason for this tragedy was the need for sustainable development as opposed to the practices of overgrazing and cutting down scarce trees for firewood, which turned fragile lands into near deserts. This evolved into a loss of productive land because of a loss of topsoil through erosion, which is very hard to reverse.

The solution to this problem of imminent climate change means a fundamental change to African economic life and behavior in order to arrest this vicious cycle of poverty. 

A Fundamental Change to African Economic Life

The foreseeable future in Africa is disorder either politically or environmentally. There is a great need for change. Although this destruction is morally repugnant to Africans, the destruction of our environment must be also addressed as an investment in our planet’s future including the stabilizing of carbon emissions.

 In economic terms the destruction of our great forests was historically only valued for their timber and the clearing of land for agriculture. Hence, there was no economic incentive to save the forests.

The Common Good Counts for Very Little.

The national interest used to be a shared value, but wherever you look today in most of Africa the rule of thumb in public life is personal gain – not public good. The common thread in all this is the complete lack of consideration for other people.

It starts with politicians, whether in government or opposition. People go into politics not to serve or make a difference, but line up their pockets. People who are in power or in a position of authority act in their own personal interests, regardless of the impact on others. This same attitude drives the politician who steals money that could be used for a hospital, school or to provide potable water, and stashes it abroad. There is little evidence that this attitude will change anytime soon.

The utter disregard for the larger interests of the country and the people is so embedded in the ruling class, it may take a mass revolt to redress. Africans are not known for staging popular revolts but that may their only salvation. In the meantime, there is a peaceful approach.

An Alternative More Peaceful Approach

Continue reading The African Famine Revisited 2

A WORLD WITHOUT AFRICAN POVERTY 2

 AFRICA POVERTY AND OUR MISSION:  

Our mission is to be the best in the world in micro hydro electric and water resource management: by evolving innovative damless hydroelectric and water transfer technology. We create Today’s Tall Tree Nurseries to support Micro Finance for women farmers and their families using the Carbon Tax Fund, a new form of foreign aid. We export Mechanization into Africa for more productive agriculture. We do all this to address the problem of African Poverty.

African Poverty: the Most Serious Threat 

Do you know why poverty is the most serious threat to world peace? Poverty leads to hopelessness, which in turn provoke people to desperate acts. One thinks one has nothing to lose by turning to violence. Poverty also leads to clashes between populations over scare resources of water and arable land.  Over one billion people live on less than $1/day: this is not a formula for world peace.

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Should MicroFinance be the First Investment in Africa?

International Aid is a $5 billion business, but ironically microfinance support only receives 1% of this amount. In an underdeveloped world of scarce resources, which should be our priority? Housing? Sanitation? Health Care? Infrastructure? Education?  All of these are important. We believe that giving the poor access to credit lets them immediately apply their farming skills. They create capital to begin the long road to recovery. Right now the poor have no control over capital.

This is opposite to the view that people are poor because they lack the skills. This view takes the initiative and responsibility from poor people.

A Conscious Corporation: Not Charity – Not Governments

Without proper guidelines, globalization has the potential of being highly destructive.The “strongest take all” must be replaced by rules that allow the poor to take a place on the highway: the divide between the haves and the have-nots is widening.

Some corporate social companies try to do good for people and the planet as long as they can do it with profit. Some of their CEOs are sincerely interested in social change, yet ultimately they are responsible to the owners or shareholders of the company that strive to increase growth in their investment. This is capitalism – half developed without a real social conscience.

Showering grants and low interest loans into the hands of the underdeveloped countries is not the answer: otherwise the problem would have been solved a long time ago. Why? These governments tend to be inefficient, slow, prone to corruption, bureaucratic and self-perpetuating, while amassing power and wealth for themselves.

Many people who are concerned with the problem of world poverty have started non-profit corporations. Yet, these companies have significant built-in weaknesses. They rely on a steady flow of donations, but when these donations stop, so does the company. In hard times, this flow slows down. Eventually, “compassion fatigue” sets in and donors stop giving. Directors of these companies know that there is never enough money to accomplish their aims.

What about the multi-lateral corporations, such as the World Bank? Like governments, they too are slow, bureaucratic, and self-serving and worst—very conservative. They look at the problem in their wide angle lens of large-scale economic growth, while the poor people are forgotten in their spin. They are looked at as objects. Unfortunately, these corporations choose to work through underdeveloped governments. Instead, they need to tap into the creative innovations outside of governments: the Social Business.

The Conscious Corporation can play a crucial role. They are above all a business, with resources, incentives and they are market savy. A Conscious Business looks at things differently: they are a non-loss business, but also a non-dividend business. Ultimately they pay back their original investors, but the business wishes to continue its long term social goals: it is self-sustaining and in this way it continues to gain more social benefits every year.

People who invest in this Conscious Business receive the same personal satisfaction as philanthropists. The difference is that there is no need to pump in donations every year as is done with charities.

The Grameen Bank in Bangledesh is a good model for micro finance: it gives loans to 7 million poor women farmers with a promise of a 97% repayment rate in 78,000 villages. This bank claims that 64% of the borrowers have crossed over from poverty over a period of five years.

Could not these poor women farmers pull themselves up by their own plow? They borrow in groups of five women – no two can be closely related. When one of the group wishes to take out a loan, one must receive approval from the other members of the group. Payment is done over a phone application, which encourages savings. There is greater flexibility in repayment, because of other financial commitments like school tax. The group acts as a social network of encouragement and psychological support. Ten or twelve such groups come together to meet weekly. This center leadership is selected democratically.

We appeal to the multinational companies with an innovative strategy: a company needs to gain a foothold in a new market. The social business can begin this process and provide a great deal of goodwill to the new company. Damone was one of those companies that partnered with the Grameen Foundation to market a nutritious yogart for the children of the poor. Their success story is explained in Creating a World without Poverty by Muhammad Yunus, the winner of a Nobel Peace Prize in 2006.

We are appealing on behalf of 50% of the world that own only 1% of the world assets. We are appealing to the top 1% of the world that own 40% of the world’s assets. We are also appealing to the top10% of the world that own 85%.

We appeal to the world’s greatest billionaires: will their grandchildren be able to enjoy their wealth with this eventual threat of global warming and pollution? Without an ethic of change, we will lose what is most priceless, which has no price tag. If basic needs are not met, poor people could easily be attracted to violence, civil unrest and terrorism.

African Energy Poverty

We are in an era of scarce energy supplies at a time of global warming and soaring global populations. Generating innovative forms of electric power is not only to light up our houses – it is lighting up our future. The operative word is “innovative”. It is pay now or there will be no future!

To make things worst, coal, oil and natural gas is quickly causing global warming and pollution from their green house gases, primarily through carbon dioxide emissions, which form an invisible blanket over the earth, thereby making the globe warmer. 

By mid-century, we will be looking at a world of 9 billion people — a 40% to 50% increase. During that same period it is expected that the increase in populaton will double the demand for all forms of energy. The “golden” one billion people living the “American style” of living will evolve into 2- 3 billion – all over-consuming and polluting at a phenomenal rate. This will all cause a doubling of carbon dioxide by mid-century. Roughly 40% of the CO2 created in United States come from the production of electricity and 30% comes from transportation. We aren’t even mentioning the pollution created in China and many South Eastern Asia cities – including 20 of their most polluted cities in the world.

The next big boom in technology will be clean energy. This opportunity will help stabilize our planet and it will provide an opportunity for some countries who embrace this innovation to renew and regenerate itself. Those countries that are prosperous and innovative will have an edge.

We are in an “energy climate” era. Unfortunately, the total investment in research and development for electric utilities in the United States is 0.15 % compared to 8 -10% for most competitive industries. The last big breakthrough in this industry was in 1957 with tha advent of the nuclear reactor. Contrast this with 8 – 9 generations in medical technology from x-Ray to the CAT Scan.

In the meantime, we are all living on the Titanic and we all have hit the iceburg. Others are still dancing in the ballroom. Nature will take its course unless we all come to grips with the problem. We need to act!
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Continue reading A WORLD WITHOUT AFRICAN POVERTY 2

AFRICAN POVERTY TRAP 2

AFRICAN POVERTY AND OUR MISSION:  

Our mission is to be the best in the world in micro hydro electric and water resource management: by evolving innovative damless hydroelectric and water transfer technology. We create Today’s Tall Tree Nurseries to support Micro Finance for women farmers and their families using the Carbon Tax Fund, a new form of foreign aid. We export Mechanization into Africa for more productive agriculture. We do this to address the problem of African Poverty.

AFRICAN POVERTY

There are many U.N. Agencies concerned with developing countries: World Bank (grants), Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) leading the fight on hunger, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD)  increasing food production, United Nation Development Program (UNDP) fighting poverty, United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) caring for the environment and biodiversity, United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) improving children’s lives, World Food Program (WFP) fighting against global hunger.Untitled-4

The Millennium Development Goals includes eradication of poverty and hunger, the empowering of gender equality of women, sustainable development, safe drinking water, productive work for youth, addressing the landlocked problems of 15 African countries and islands, and the benefiting of new technology.

Over half of Africa’s population is deemed to live in extreme poverty. Over the last two centuries these poorest of poor have not been able to improve their lot. In fact, the gap between the richest economies and Africa had widened from one to twenty. The main reason for this increase has been technological advancement — not exploitation of the poor. The fight of terrorism is really a fight of poverty and deprivation.

The innovation gap has become one of the most important reasons for the divergence of wealth. It started with the advent of the steam engine and continued with electrification followed by massive investments in research and development.  

The poor nations of Africa faced obstacles related to climate (drought), depleted soils, food production, disease (malaria and AIDS), energy resources, over-population, inept and corrupt governments, a high debt load, denial of women’s rights and proximity to world markets (rural isolation).

African countries can break out of the poverty trap and put one foot on the first rung of the economic ladder. Some African countries avoided falling into this poverty trap because of their food production: fertilizer and proper seed selection. Many of these obstacles can be overcome with new technologies: irrigation and conservation measures.

African farmers have never experienced the Green Revolution which came about with high-yield varieties of food crops, irrigation and fertilizer. In India, wheat production climbed in 1960 from 11 million metric tons to 55 million metric tons in 1990 as a result of the Green Revolution.Untitled-5

The poverty itself causes economic stagnation: trees are cut down for firewood and soil becomes utterly destitute. These poor Africans have the lowest saving rate (10%) because they use their income merely to stay alive. They have little cash available for fertilizer, medicines or school fees and other basic needs. The minimum saving rate should be in excess of 15%.

Too little has been done to identify the specific, low-cost intervention that will make a difference in economic growth. We have been trained to deal with throwing millions of dollars at these problems, which remain after centuries of welfare. In Uganda, only 1.4% of the annual budget of $1.8 billion is devoted to water supply and sanitation, while only 4.8% was allocated to energy.

Crop yields can be sharply increased and electricity can be extended to the villages. What is required is investment for sustained economic development on a large scale. This is not a relentless drive for one magic bullet that will turn the tide. It is an integrated solution involving available land, women farmers and their families, tree nursery supported by a Carbon Tax Fund, fertilizing from the fish rabbit farm, and irrigation and electricity from the HUG Energy System.0000Today's-Tall-Tree2


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 will take place near a water source and beside a school with added agricultural training and monitored by village field officers. The first stage is the Living Water MicroFinance Inc. support for women farmers, which is not a welfare handout, but a rotating system of micro loans, which is payable at the end of a harvest.  The second phase is the introduction of a tree nursery, which is supported by the Carbon Tax Fund. Continue reading AFRICAN POVERTY TRAP 2

The Biodiversity Trend 2

BIODIVERSITY AND OUR MISSION:  

Our mission is to be the best in the world in micro hydro electric and water resource management: by evolving innovative damless hydroelectric and water transfer technology. We create Today’s Tall Tree Nurseries to support Micro Finance for women farmers and their families using the Carbon Tax Fund, a new form of foreign aid. We export Mechanization into Africa for more productive agriculture. We do this to protect our environment and biodiversity.

What is the Biodiversity Trend?

  1. Investors want companies to manage risks properly:
  • 67% of shareholders think it’s less risky to invest in socially responsible companies
  • During the financial crisis, sustainability-focused companies outperformed industry average by 10% over 3 months and 15% over 6 months
  1. Consumers expect companies to act responsibly:
  • 48% will choose a brand that supports a good cause even if the price is higher.
  • Over 50% have either rewarded or punished a company for their CSR behavior.
  • 84% feel that they can influence company behaviour on these issues.
  1. There is higher employee engagement, attraction and retention:
  • Attraction of top quality people
  • Reduction in turnover
  • Reduction in absenteeism
  • Increased employee satisfaction

The Biodiversity Fund: an ecological restoration project, aimed to protect and restore habitats  

Continue reading The Biodiversity Trend 2

HUG LOW COST FRESH WATER TRANSFER 2

Based on the vortex or a physical phenomena of the Spiral:

HUG Spiraling Pipeline

WATER TRANSFER AND OUR MISSION:  

Our mission is to be the best in the world in micro hydro electric and water transfer management: by evolving innovative damless hydroelectric and water transfer technology. We create Today’s Tall Tree Nurseries to support Micro Finance for women farmers and their families using the Carbon Tax Fund, a new form of foreign aid. We export Mechanization for more productive agriculture.

Water shortages may not lead to war, but they most certainly lead to food shortages, increased poverty and the spread of disease– followed by social unrest and violence.

Today, the world faces a crisis that only a handful of experts were even vaguely aware of in 1970: climate disruption.

However, evidence suggests that future adaptation will be different and probably more difficult, as resources near depletion at the global scale.

Unfortunately the world has yet to make sustainable efforts to cope with this impending challenge.

The Shortage of Water:  the Water Transfer

There is no question that water is absolutely necessary for human survival. However, over one billion people on Earth already do not have access to a clean water supply. With a growing population, this number will drastically increase, especially as we continue to abuse, pollute, and deplete our current supplies. Water use will increase by 20% between the years 2000 and 2020, and by 2025, 58% of the population is expected to live in countries of low to catastrophic water availability. Even more water will be needed for irrigation as growing regional populations will require increased agricultural production. In the not too distant future, arid lands that are rapidly being developed will not be able to sustain their people or their land use practices.

The warning signs are clear: falling water tables, shrinking rivers and lakes, widespread pollution, creeping desertification.  Something must be done about the coming, and present shortage of water that is occurring on a global scale. We all live downstream.

How much money to solve the water crisis?

Most people are taking a serious look at the numbers within the context of the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) to “reduce by half the proportion of people without sustainable access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation by 2015.”

The World Bank offers a range of cost estimates to reach MDG goals. They estimate the cost of reaching “basic levels of coverage…in water and sanitation” to be $9 billion at the low end, and $30 billion a year for “achieving universal coverage” for water and sanitation. Continue reading HUG LOW COST FRESH WATER TRANSFER 2