Tag Archives: water shortages

WATER RESOURCES IN HAITI SOLVED 2

Water Resources Haiti

Water resources in Haiti are a major concern.

The lack of adequate safe (potable) water supplies for basic human needs is a significant problem throughout Haiti, although surface and ground water resources are abundant. This situation leads to increased competition for limited resources. Several of the main reasons for this situation are:

  • uneven rainfall distribution;
  • degradation of the watersheds caused by deforestation;
  • rapid growth in urban areas with demand beyond capacity;
  • poor distribution networks;
  • poor water resources management;
  • no single agency responsible for management of water ;
  • lack of adequate data needed to make informed decisions;
  • poor irrigation supply network leading to underdevelopment; 
  • lack of wastewater  treatment and solid waste disposal.

Most of the streams are relatively small and less than 100 kilometers long. With each passing year, the rivers and streams flow more like torrents and less like stable permanent rivers. The largest natural lake in the country is Étang Saumâtre has no outlet, and contains brackish water. Many of the smaller natural lakes that exist throughout the country also contain brackish water. 

ABJECT POVERTY

About 54 percent of the population lives in abject poverty. Based on 1997 estimates, the unemployment rate in a work force of approximately 3.6 million is about 38 percent.

Only 61.7% of the population have jobs but these are the working poor as many make only $3.10 per day. Women are least likely to go to school or have a job. Violence against women is common with 22.8% of women reporting abuse – what of the abuse that goes unreported? Of course the issue of “restavek” children or child slavery persists despite national and international laws. It is a socially accepted norm to sell children ages 5-15 and to make then work for no pay, to deny them the opportunity to attend school and results in children being abused both physically and sexually.

In Cite Soleil – the largest slum in Haiti is 3 square miles and has about 200-300,000 people. Most are unemployed and the vast majority are children. In Haiti 65% of the people are under 25 years old. The children live in extreme hunger and are exposed to gang violence, high risk for HIV/AIDS, no opportunity for an education, no sewer system and rat infestations. On average – nine people live in one shack.

Most people who live in the slums state their biggest fear is violence – especially for women and girls (Haugen and Boutros, 2014). In the slums, this problem is rampant; acts of violence are intentionally hidden, legal protection is non-existent and violence keeps the poor from ever escaping poverty.

Port-au-Prince

Water supply for Port-au-Prince, the most populated area in Haiti, is poor. In 1995 only about 35 percent of the nearly 2.5 million inhabitants had access to the water system. Most receive water only twice a week. The lack of service is attributed to

  • system losses associated with the age of the distribution system and theft of service, estimated at 60 percent;
  •  interruptions in the power supply to the wells and pumps; and
  •  contamination of water sources.

Continue reading WATER RESOURCES IN HAITI SOLVED 2

Age of Consequences 2

Climate Security: Building National Security

Climate change presents the greatest challenge of our time. It is a national security threat that America’s military, and militaries around the world are taking seriously. We are entering into the Age of Consequences.

Age of Consequences

Climate change alone will not cause wars, but it serves as an “Accelerant of Instability” or a “Threat Multiplier” that makes already existing threats worse. The threat of global warming for security will manifest through a range of effects: resource scarcity, extreme weather, food scarcity, water insecurity, and sea level rise will all threaten societies around the world. Too many governments are not prepared for these threats, either because they do not have the resources or because they have not planned ahead. How societies and governments respond to the increase in instability will determine whether climate change will lead to war. We’re really talking about violent events that require less organization like protests, riots and strikes.

  • The science is definitive enough for action. We cannot wait until you have 100% certainty before acting.
  • Climate change alone will not cause war, but it serves as an “accelerant of instability” that makes already existing threats worse.
  • Global threats include: migration, conflict over scarce resources, reduced food production, water insecurity, and others.
  • The military is preparing for climate change by, studying potential threats, and preparing to deploy when needed.

A perfect example of a national security treat was the Arab Spring. The terrific drought that struck that entire region in 2010 had global ramifications. It was especially disastrous for Egypt. The drought caused Russia and other exporters to end wheat exports.  Somewhat unexpected, it made a major contribution to the blossoming of the Arab Spring. The country has only been able to sustain about half its needs True, there was also a desire to embrace democracy, but that wasn’t what really drove the masses: it was the lack of wheat.

Sahel Africa

Traditionally, most of the people in the Sahel have been semi-nomads, farming and raising livestock in a system of transhumance, which is probably the most sustainable way of utilizing the Sahel. The Sahel, home to some 232 million people, comprising portions of ten (10) African countries, from left to right: [northern] Senegal, [southern] Mauritania, [central] Mali, [northern] Burkina Faso, [southern] Algeria, [southwestern] Niger, [northern] Nigeria, [central] Chad, [central] Sudan and [northern] Eritrea.

Sahel Africa

Contrast the situation in Ethiopia where these conditions are almost identical to Somali and South Sudan, which both have very poor governance. Ethiopia on the other hand is an active participant in the international climate change process of the UNFCCC, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change involved with risk mitigation and farmer adaptation. Generally, Ethiopia has not suffered in the same way as both South Sudan and Somali.

WHAT TO DO?

Continue reading Age of Consequences 2

WATER CRISIS: A CATASTROPHE 2

  • TODAY’S CRISIS WILL BECOME A CATASTROPHE.

water crisisIf water is not managed better…water OUR THIRSTY WORLD

As water becomes ever more scant the world needs to conserve it, use it more efficiently. Researchers from MIT predict that by 2050, more than half of humanity will live in water-stressed areas, where people are now extracting unsustainable amounts from available freshwater sources.  We can expect a water crisis that will go viral into a catastrophe if we continue with business as usual.

Many people have a strong moral aversion to paying for the life-sustaining liquid. Some feel that water is a right, and should therefore be free. Others lobby governments to subsidize its distribution to favored groups. This results in vast, but preventable waste.

To make matters worse, few places price water properly. Usually, it is artificially cheap, because politicians are scared to charge much for something essential that falls from the sky. This means that consumers have little incentive to conserve it and investors have little incentive to build pipes and other infrastructure to bring it to where it is needed most.

water scarcity

In many countries people can pump as much water as they like from underground aquifers, because rules are either lax or not enforced. But it is unsustainable: around a fifth of the world’s aquifers are over-exploited.

.water crisis

India appears to be headed for a very great water crisis because of the inexpensive available pumps together with a large population:
GROUND WATER USAGE

People do not drink much water—only a few liters a day. But putting food on their tables requires floods of the stuff. Growing 1 lb of wheat takes 125 gallons of water; fattening a cow to produce the same weight of beef involves 12 times more. Overall, agriculture accounts for more than 70% of global freshwater withdrawals. Farmers in parched places grow thirsty cash crops such as avocados, which could easily be imported from somewhere wetter.

THE COMING CRISIS

Continue reading WATER CRISIS: A CATASTROPHE 2

AFRICA: Future World Food Basket 2

AFRICA FUTURE & OUR  MISSION:  

Our mission is to be the best in the world in micro hydro electric and water resource management: by evolving innovative damless hydroelectric and water transfer technology. We create Today’s Tall Tree Nurseries to support Micro Finance for women farmers and their families using the Carbon Tax Fund, a new form of foreign aid. We export Mechanization into Africa for more productive agriculture for a Brighter Future in Africa.

ABYSMAL AFRICA

In contrast with Asia, which has seen huge increases in agricultural yields in the last 40 years, sub-Saharan Africa’s track record has been abysmal. Food production is actually 10% lower today than in 1960, yet over this time period the aggregate world food production has increased by 145%.

Climate change could push prices up by 130%. Rice tripled in price over a period of four months, wheat doubled and corn rose 46 per cent. This world food crisis of high grain import prices, on top of high fuel prices, has placed an acute economic squeeze on consumers in developing countries.

People move in search of better opportunities elsewhere and jobs!! The high rate of urban migration in Africa, particularly among young people, is largely because the rural economy – which is predominantly agrarian – has been stagnant. These young people are not fleeing from farming as an occupation. They are fleeing from poverty!!

AGRICULTURAL GOVERNMENT SPENDING

Agriculture can deliver 2-3 times the return on investment, in terms of improved economic well-being, as other sectors: it represents 32% of Africa’s GDP; and employs 65% of the working population. Most importantly, it is the sector where the poorest on the continent are most likely to be engaged in their struggle to survive. Some African countries’ improved economic performance over the last 10 to 15 years indicates that they do have the potential to become net exporters of food. If we transform the agriculture sector, we will transform the African continent!

The best part of two decades there has been a consensus on aid in Africa – namely that the state should not subsidize smallholder agriculture. Nearly 30 percent of World Bank lending once went to agricultural modernization, but now it is just 8 percent. China’s dramatic reduction of poverty has been achieved by growth primarily in the agricultural sector, not the industrial. Since the late 1970s, improvements in technology and infrastructure helped boost production in smallholder agriculture, with farmers’ incomes rising at more than 7% a year. The result is that 200 million small-scale farmers working an average of 0.6 hectare of land are now feeding a population of 1.3 billion.

The Maputo declaration of 2003 pledged African countries to 10% of government spending for agriculture. This took place at a conference of African Ministers for Agriculture, chaired a meeting at FAO headquarters. Thirteen years later, many African countries have not even reached 4%.

Malawi’s defied these teachings and put in place a series of policy measures that increased agricultural development and overall economic development at the cost of 16% of government spending.

LAND TENURE

During one of the biggest challenges is the issue of land tenure. It is difficult to negotiate adequate secure tenure and get permission from all of the relevant authorities. Living Water Microfinance Inc. has been focusing its efforts, especially for women, who generally are not allowed to own land.

The Gene Revolution: Africa Future

The Green Revolution of the 1960s and ’70s is now being overtaken by “the Gene Revolution” — the development and spread of GM crops across the world. The uptake of genetically modified (GM) crops is the fastest adoption rate of any crop technology, increasing from 1.7 million hectares in 1996 to 148 million hectares in 2010. The USDA says 94% of soy and 75% of all corn grown in the U.S. is genetically modified.

African countries such as South Africa, Burkina Faso and Egypt have adopted GM crops. Other countries such as Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania are preparing to start field trials. Farming giants like China, Brazil and India have embraced biotech crops. And even the European Commission (EC) is acknowledging that existing GM crops do not carry any unique risks. In a recent study, the EC has found that GM crops are at least as safe for consumers and the environment as conventionally bred plant varieties, and sometimes safer. It also concluded that GM crops could help developing countries meet their food needs while addressing the challenges of climate change in a sustainable way.

Africa is steadily joining the biotechnology revolution. South Africa’s GM crop production stood at 2.0 million hectares (4.94 million acres) in 2010.

GMO DISADVANTAGE

Anti-GMO activists are still engaged in stopping this GM effort. The European Parliament voted that calls on the G7 countries not to support the use of genetically modified (GMO) seeds in Africa, despite the dangers of food security and poverty levels on the continent. 

As reported in a New York Times article, the ridiculously high prices of seeds and pesticides are causing farmers to make less money than ever. Additionally, as pests and weeds become increasingly immune to insecticides, farmers have to spend more and more money on chemicals. And let’s not forget, they are also legally required to buy new seeds every season unless they want to be sued or forced to burn all their plants.

Currently, just three mega companies control over half of the global seed market, which has caused prices to skyrocket. For example, the average price of planting an acre of soybeans has gone up 325 percent since 1995.

So, If GMOs Aren’t the Answer…

Continue reading AFRICA: Future World Food Basket 2

The African Famine Revisited 2

AFRICAN FAMINE AND OUR MISSION:  

Our mission is to be the best in the world in micro hydro electric and water resource management: by evolving innovative damless hydroelectric and water transfer technology. We create Today’s Tall Tree Nurseries to support Micro Finance for women farmers and their families using the Carbon Tax Fund, a new form of foreign aid. We export  African Mechanization  for more productive agriculture and to fight famine.

African Famine

When the rains failed in 1984 it was 16 straight years of meagre rainfall, which was all too much. Most of the sub-Saharan Africa was affected including Ethiopia. The survival of 30 million Africans was in imminent risk. There was yet another crop failure in Northern and Western Sudan.

The lessons learned from these famines are tough ones: droughts are inevitable, while famine is not. It is far better to undertake development programs in advance of climate failure and the most economical use of scarce resources. This means a long term support to avert future tragedies.Untitled-1f

Part of the reason for this tragedy was the need for sustainable development as opposed to the practices of overgrazing and cutting down scarce trees for firewood, which turned fragile lands into near deserts. This evolved into a loss of productive land because of a loss of topsoil through erosion, which is very hard to reverse.

The solution to this problem of imminent climate change means a fundamental change to African economic life and behavior in order to arrest this vicious cycle of poverty. 

A Fundamental Change to African Economic Life

The foreseeable future in Africa is disorder either politically or environmentally. There is a great need for change. Although this destruction is morally repugnant to Africans, the destruction of our environment must be also addressed as an investment in our planet’s future including the stabilizing of carbon emissions.

 In economic terms the destruction of our great forests was historically only valued for their timber and the clearing of land for agriculture. Hence, there was no economic incentive to save the forests.

The Common Good Counts for Very Little.

The national interest used to be a shared value, but wherever you look today in most of Africa the rule of thumb in public life is personal gain – not public good. The common thread in all this is the complete lack of consideration for other people.

It starts with politicians, whether in government or opposition. People go into politics not to serve or make a difference, but line up their pockets. People who are in power or in a position of authority act in their own personal interests, regardless of the impact on others. This same attitude drives the politician who steals money that could be used for a hospital, school or to provide potable water, and stashes it abroad. There is little evidence that this attitude will change anytime soon.

The utter disregard for the larger interests of the country and the people is so embedded in the ruling class, it may take a mass revolt to redress. Africans are not known for staging popular revolts but that may their only salvation. In the meantime, there is a peaceful approach.

An Alternative More Peaceful Approach

Continue reading The African Famine Revisited 2

A WORLD WITHOUT AFRICAN POVERTY 2

 AFRICA POVERTY AND OUR MISSION:  

Our mission is to be the best in the world in micro hydro electric and water resource management: by evolving innovative damless hydroelectric and water transfer technology. We create Today’s Tall Tree Nurseries to support Micro Finance for women farmers and their families using the Carbon Tax Fund, a new form of foreign aid. We export Mechanization into Africa for more productive agriculture. We do all this to address the problem of African Poverty.

African Poverty: the Most Serious Threat 

Do you know why poverty is the most serious threat to world peace? Poverty leads to hopelessness, which in turn provoke people to desperate acts. One thinks one has nothing to lose by turning to violence. Poverty also leads to clashes between populations over scare resources of water and arable land.  Over one billion people live on less than $1/day: this is not a formula for world peace.

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Should MicroFinance be the First Investment in Africa?

International Aid is a $5 billion business, but ironically microfinance support only receives 1% of this amount. In an underdeveloped world of scarce resources, which should be our priority? Housing? Sanitation? Health Care? Infrastructure? Education?  All of these are important. We believe that giving the poor access to credit lets them immediately apply their farming skills. They create capital to begin the long road to recovery. Right now the poor have no control over capital.

This is opposite to the view that people are poor because they lack the skills. This view takes the initiative and responsibility from poor people.

A Conscious Corporation: Not Charity – Not Governments

Without proper guidelines, globalization has the potential of being highly destructive.The “strongest take all” must be replaced by rules that allow the poor to take a place on the highway: the divide between the haves and the have-nots is widening.

Some corporate social companies try to do good for people and the planet as long as they can do it with profit. Some of their CEOs are sincerely interested in social change, yet ultimately they are responsible to the owners or shareholders of the company that strive to increase growth in their investment. This is capitalism – half developed without a real social conscience.

Showering grants and low interest loans into the hands of the underdeveloped countries is not the answer: otherwise the problem would have been solved a long time ago. Why? These governments tend to be inefficient, slow, prone to corruption, bureaucratic and self-perpetuating, while amassing power and wealth for themselves.

Many people who are concerned with the problem of world poverty have started non-profit corporations. Yet, these companies have significant built-in weaknesses. They rely on a steady flow of donations, but when these donations stop, so does the company. In hard times, this flow slows down. Eventually, “compassion fatigue” sets in and donors stop giving. Directors of these companies know that there is never enough money to accomplish their aims.

What about the multi-lateral corporations, such as the World Bank? Like governments, they too are slow, bureaucratic, and self-serving and worst—very conservative. They look at the problem in their wide angle lens of large-scale economic growth, while the poor people are forgotten in their spin. They are looked at as objects. Unfortunately, these corporations choose to work through underdeveloped governments. Instead, they need to tap into the creative innovations outside of governments: the Social Business.

The Conscious Corporation can play a crucial role. They are above all a business, with resources, incentives and they are market savy. A Conscious Business looks at things differently: they are a non-loss business, but also a non-dividend business. Ultimately they pay back their original investors, but the business wishes to continue its long term social goals: it is self-sustaining and in this way it continues to gain more social benefits every year.

People who invest in this Conscious Business receive the same personal satisfaction as philanthropists. The difference is that there is no need to pump in donations every year as is done with charities.

The Grameen Bank in Bangledesh is a good model for micro finance: it gives loans to 7 million poor women farmers with a promise of a 97% repayment rate in 78,000 villages. This bank claims that 64% of the borrowers have crossed over from poverty over a period of five years.

Could not these poor women farmers pull themselves up by their own plow? They borrow in groups of five women – no two can be closely related. When one of the group wishes to take out a loan, one must receive approval from the other members of the group. Payment is done over a phone application, which encourages savings. There is greater flexibility in repayment, because of other financial commitments like school tax. The group acts as a social network of encouragement and psychological support. Ten or twelve such groups come together to meet weekly. This center leadership is selected democratically.

We appeal to the multinational companies with an innovative strategy: a company needs to gain a foothold in a new market. The social business can begin this process and provide a great deal of goodwill to the new company. Damone was one of those companies that partnered with the Grameen Foundation to market a nutritious yogart for the children of the poor. Their success story is explained in Creating a World without Poverty by Muhammad Yunus, the winner of a Nobel Peace Prize in 2006.

We are appealing on behalf of 50% of the world that own only 1% of the world assets. We are appealing to the top 1% of the world that own 40% of the world’s assets. We are also appealing to the top10% of the world that own 85%.

We appeal to the world’s greatest billionaires: will their grandchildren be able to enjoy their wealth with this eventual threat of global warming and pollution? Without an ethic of change, we will lose what is most priceless, which has no price tag. If basic needs are not met, poor people could easily be attracted to violence, civil unrest and terrorism.

African Energy Poverty

We are in an era of scarce energy supplies at a time of global warming and soaring global populations. Generating innovative forms of electric power is not only to light up our houses – it is lighting up our future. The operative word is “innovative”. It is pay now or there will be no future!

To make things worst, coal, oil and natural gas is quickly causing global warming and pollution from their green house gases, primarily through carbon dioxide emissions, which form an invisible blanket over the earth, thereby making the globe warmer. 

By mid-century, we will be looking at a world of 9 billion people — a 40% to 50% increase. During that same period it is expected that the increase in populaton will double the demand for all forms of energy. The “golden” one billion people living the “American style” of living will evolve into 2- 3 billion – all over-consuming and polluting at a phenomenal rate. This will all cause a doubling of carbon dioxide by mid-century. Roughly 40% of the CO2 created in United States come from the production of electricity and 30% comes from transportation. We aren’t even mentioning the pollution created in China and many South Eastern Asia cities – including 20 of their most polluted cities in the world.

The next big boom in technology will be clean energy. This opportunity will help stabilize our planet and it will provide an opportunity for some countries who embrace this innovation to renew and regenerate itself. Those countries that are prosperous and innovative will have an edge.

We are in an “energy climate” era. Unfortunately, the total investment in research and development for electric utilities in the United States is 0.15 % compared to 8 -10% for most competitive industries. The last big breakthrough in this industry was in 1957 with tha advent of the nuclear reactor. Contrast this with 8 – 9 generations in medical technology from x-Ray to the CAT Scan.

In the meantime, we are all living on the Titanic and we all have hit the iceburg. Others are still dancing in the ballroom. Nature will take its course unless we all come to grips with the problem. We need to act!
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Continue reading A WORLD WITHOUT AFRICAN POVERTY 2

The Biodiversity Trend 2

BIODIVERSITY AND OUR MISSION:  

Our mission is to be the best in the world in micro hydro electric and water resource management: by evolving innovative damless hydroelectric and water transfer technology. We create Today’s Tall Tree Nurseries to support Micro Finance for women farmers and their families using the Carbon Tax Fund, a new form of foreign aid. We export Mechanization into Africa for more productive agriculture. We do this to protect our environment and biodiversity.

What is the Biodiversity Trend?

  1. Investors want companies to manage risks properly:
  • 67% of shareholders think it’s less risky to invest in socially responsible companies
  • During the financial crisis, sustainability-focused companies outperformed industry average by 10% over 3 months and 15% over 6 months
  1. Consumers expect companies to act responsibly:
  • 48% will choose a brand that supports a good cause even if the price is higher.
  • Over 50% have either rewarded or punished a company for their CSR behavior.
  • 84% feel that they can influence company behaviour on these issues.
  1. There is higher employee engagement, attraction and retention:
  • Attraction of top quality people
  • Reduction in turnover
  • Reduction in absenteeism
  • Increased employee satisfaction

The Biodiversity Fund: an ecological restoration project, aimed to protect and restore habitats  

Continue reading The Biodiversity Trend 2

A PROTRACTED GLOBAL STAGNATION? 2

GLOBAL STAGNATION & OUR MISSION  

Our mission is to be the best in the world in micro hydro electric and water resource management: by evolving innovative damless hydroelectric and water transfer technology. We create Today’s Tall Tree Nurseries to support Micro Finance for women farmers and their families using the Carbon Tax Fund, a new form of foreign aid. We export Mechanization into Africa for more productive agriculture. These activities can help avoid Global Stagnation.

Global Stagnation

The global economy is entering an era of protracted stagnation, similar to what Japan has experienced for over a decade. That is the message from The Age of Stagnation: Why Perpetual Growth is Unattainable and the Global Economy is in Peril by Satyajit Das.

Untitled-2The author challenges the assumption that growth can be perpetual and questions the ability of political leaders to enact the tough structural changes needed. He is particularly critical of the “easy money” approach to dealing with the great recession of 2008, citing the dangers of excessive debt and deep-seated fundamental imbalances. The fallout of these poor policies, he argues, will affect not only the business sector, but also the lifestyles and prosperity of average citizens and future generations.

Much of the growth of earnings in recent years is a result of cost cutting rather than growing revenues. Companies have embarked on massive stock buybacks to buoy earnings and improve their stocks’ performance, which Das does not consider tangible growth. Just the illusion of growth has pushed valuations well above their intrinsic worth. The stock market crashes of last summer and early 2016, though dismissed as necessary corrections, may be an early indication of a stock market which is losing the support of quantitative easing and low interest rates.

A new BBC report based on recent research suggests the water situation is even worse, that half of the human race is now experiencing water shortages. Continue reading A PROTRACTED GLOBAL STAGNATION? 2

SOFT POWER 2

SOFT POWER AND OUR MISSION:  

Our mission is to be the best in the world in micro hydro electric and water resource management: by evolving innovative damless hydroelectric and water transfer technology. We create Today’s Tall Tree Nurseries to support Micro Finance for women farmers and their families using the Carbon Tax Fund, a new form of foreign aid. We export Mechanization into Africa for more productive agriculture. All this is a form of Soft Power.

Soft Power

Soft power

 The term Soft Power refers to the ability to shape the preferences of others and getting others to want the outcomes you want.

Canada actively uses a rich portfolio of soft power tools and promotes organizations to promote democratic values and ideals such as CIDA (Canadian International Development Agency), who in turn support NGO’s like Living Water MicroFinance Inc.

American influence was in decline worldwide, and international opinion (exacerbated by internally directed media criticism) of the U.S. steadily decreased, even in allied nations. Both United States of America and Canada must invest significant intellectual and financial capital in programs to reverse these trends.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau stating recently that meeting the U.N.-endorsed goal to spend 0.7 per cent of Canada’s gross domestic product on foreign aid may be too ambitious.

The U.S. and Canadian government can better maximize the effectiveness of soft power instruments and efforts through increased partnerships with NGOs. By providing humanitarian and development assistance in areas typically inaccessible to government agencies, NGOs are often able to access potential areas before the government can establish or strengthen diplomatic or developmental relations including intelligence.

The U.S. and Canada must develop a truly integrated national security strategy that synchronizes both hard and soft power appropriate for the specifics of each situation, and that adjusts as the particular threat evolves. This mix is now commonly referred to as “smart power.”

Smart power demands a strategy with commensurate flexibility. The HUG Energy System is an innovative system that promises to deliver irrigation and electricity in remote areas of under developed countries. Now that is Smart Power!

The index compares the relative strength of countries’ soft power infrastructure; testing the quality of a country’s political institutions, the extent of their cultural appeal, the strength of their diplomatic network, the global reputation of their higher education system and the attractiveness of their economic model.

Towards a Soft Power Future?

Continue reading SOFT POWER 2

Carbon Pollution and Irrigation 2

 CARBON POLLUTION AND OUR MISSION: 

Our mission is to be the best in the world in micro hydro electric and water resource management: by evolving innovative damless hydroelectric and water transfer technology. We create Today’s Tall Tree Nurseries to support Micro Finance for women farmers and their families using the Carbon Tax Fund, a new form of foreign aid. We export Mechanization into Africa for more productive agriculture. We do this to address Carbon Pollution.

TO SOLVE WORLD’S CARBON POLLUTION

New Trees are the only solution to soaking up Carbon Dioxide:

Our Mission: to help solve the problem of carbon dioxide build up in the world by growing and managing mature forests of foliage, fruit and nut trees that eventually are used in lumber — not firewood. The Carbon Tax Fund supports a Micro finance initiative to support women farmers and their families who will nurture these trees over their lifetime. The Net Present Value of each tree is $1.49 for 25 years.

Please Noteanother calculation of NPV of fruit trees living for 25 years = $0.49/tree plus $1.00/tree for maintenance: $1.49/tree. (Fruit trees are productive for 25 years and then are replaced.)

Carbon Tax & Irrigation

Africa has 60% of the world’s uncultivated arable land!

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Agroforestry is a win-win solution to the seemingly difficult choice between reforestation and agricultural land use, because it increases the storage of carbon and also enhances agricultural productivity.

Trees in the agroecosystem may help buffer against both production risk and income risk. Lots of excellent fruit and vegetables can be added very economically to the diet as well as forage for the rabbits.

Rabbit farmers could grow foliage trees like Moringa trees as a living fence for nutritious leaves for the 50 families and forage for the rabbits. One hundred grams of fresh Moringa tree leaves provide the same amount of protein as an egg. The Moringa tree pod is cooked as a vegetable in India. Ben-Oil is produced from these pods.

Farmers can also grow the allergy-free Mulberry, in which the ripe fruit is edible and is widely used in pies, tarts and wines. Rabbits love them and are fast and productive too. Bamboo can be grown as excellent material for cages and even buildings.

The actual goal of carbon sequestration is to reduce carbon emissions in the world. Just as important is the creation of a continuous sustainable agroforestry opportunity for women farmers and their family who will maintain the orchards and trees over the 50 years. The orchard trees are chosen for both their produce (fruit, nuts and foliage) and their value as lumber. The carbon capture remains in the lumber as opposed to being burned off as firewood.

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THE RABBIT FISH FARM and Today's-Tall-Trees smart carbon tax subsidies have the potential to change the growth of the Africa’s small holder farmers. This will help solve the problem of carbon dioxide build up in the world by growing and managing mature forests of foliage, fruit and nut trees that eventually are used in lumber — not firewood. The Carbon Tax Fund supports a Microfinance initiative to support women farmers and their families who will nurture these trees over their lifetime. The Net Present Value of each tree is $1.49 over 25 years.

The last piece of the puzzle is irrigation and electricity. The HUG System provides both irrigation and 780 Kw (5,470,000 Kwh) of electricity from the kinetic energy gained from nearby moving water. South Africa household consumption is 2,760 Kwh/year: this amount of electricity would support 2000 households.

The HUG DifferenceUntitled-3

HUG offers off-grid solutions to create smart, renewable approaches to bring hydro electric power and irrigation to the poor faster, cheaper and more effectively: HugEnergy.us

Annual Carbon Sequestration

FACT: This increase in carbon dioxide from roughly 280 parts per million (ppm) prior to the Industrial Revolution to about 392 ppm today is having a dramatic impact on our climate, both warming our climate and altering our weather with more droughts and more very extreme weather events. Continue reading Carbon Pollution and Irrigation 2