Tag Archives: World Food Program

SUBSISTENCE FARMERS in AFRICA 2

 SUBSISTENCE FARMERS NEED HOPE
Subsistence Farmers

Consider the livelihoods of the tens of millions of vulnerable subsistence small-holder farmers around the world. In 20 to 25 years we will get to a point in some places that either it will be too hot, too dry, too wet, or too cold for the crops we are planting and you, which will be incredibly disruptive at best.

Over the last two decades, either early or late on set of rainy seasons, unexpected rainfall, declining rainfall, and extreme day and night temperature are common.

According to The International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), 75% of the world’s 1.2 billion poor (defined as consuming less than one purchasing-power adjusted dollar per day) live and work in rural areas. 50% of the developing-country rural population were smallholders (farming 3 ha or less of crop land), and ≈25% were landless. The proportion of smallholders in sub-Saharan Africa was higher at 73%. 

Environmental degradation in such tropical dry land areas is widespread, irreversible or appropriately referred to as “desertification”. All this, and other stressors, are seen as contributing to an increased vulnerability to drought, which in turn feeds back in to environmental degradation and conflict. There will be eventual impacts on human development indicators such as health and education.

There is a bright side: increasingly unstable weather in recent years has left many farmers more willing to try new ideas. Many are now open to adapting of using practices like crop diversification, planting date adjustment, soil and water conservation and management, increasing the intensity of input use, integrating crop with livestock and rabbits, and tree planting. Subsistence Farmers

  • ·         Small-holder farmers can shift to irrigated farming in the face of climate variability.
  • ·         Small-holder farmers can hold some wealth in bank accounts, and others use micro finance credit to expand.
  • ·         Small-holder farmers can use supplementary feed for livestock, purchased or lopped from trees in their orchards.
  • ·         Small-holder farmers can engage in rabbit accumulation as a rational form of insurance against drought. 

 FOOD AID: EARLY SOLUTIONS NOW

Why in a “world of plenty” are 20 million people face famine? Continue reading SUBSISTENCE FARMERS in AFRICA 2

AFRICAN POVERTY TRAP 2

AFRICAN POVERTY AND OUR MISSION:  

Our mission is to be the best in the world in micro hydro electric and water resource management: by evolving innovative damless hydroelectric and water transfer technology. We create Today’s Tall Tree Nurseries to support Micro Finance for women farmers and their families using the Carbon Tax Fund, a new form of foreign aid. We export Mechanization into Africa for more productive agriculture. We do this to address the problem of African Poverty.

AFRICAN POVERTY

There are many U.N. Agencies concerned with developing countries: World Bank (grants), Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) leading the fight on hunger, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD)  increasing food production, United Nation Development Program (UNDP) fighting poverty, United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) caring for the environment and biodiversity, United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) improving children’s lives, World Food Program (WFP) fighting against global hunger.Untitled-4

The Millennium Development Goals includes eradication of poverty and hunger, the empowering of gender equality of women, sustainable development, safe drinking water, productive work for youth, addressing the landlocked problems of 15 African countries and islands, and the benefiting of new technology.

Over half of Africa’s population is deemed to live in extreme poverty. Over the last two centuries these poorest of poor have not been able to improve their lot. In fact, the gap between the richest economies and Africa had widened from one to twenty. The main reason for this increase has been technological advancement — not exploitation of the poor. The fight of terrorism is really a fight of poverty and deprivation.

The innovation gap has become one of the most important reasons for the divergence of wealth. It started with the advent of the steam engine and continued with electrification followed by massive investments in research and development.  

The poor nations of Africa faced obstacles related to climate (drought), depleted soils, food production, disease (malaria and AIDS), energy resources, over-population, inept and corrupt governments, a high debt load, denial of women’s rights and proximity to world markets (rural isolation).

African countries can break out of the poverty trap and put one foot on the first rung of the economic ladder. Some African countries avoided falling into this poverty trap because of their food production: fertilizer and proper seed selection. Many of these obstacles can be overcome with new technologies: irrigation and conservation measures.

African farmers have never experienced the Green Revolution which came about with high-yield varieties of food crops, irrigation and fertilizer. In India, wheat production climbed in 1960 from 11 million metric tons to 55 million metric tons in 1990 as a result of the Green Revolution.Untitled-5

The poverty itself causes economic stagnation: trees are cut down for firewood and soil becomes utterly destitute. These poor Africans have the lowest saving rate (10%) because they use their income merely to stay alive. They have little cash available for fertilizer, medicines or school fees and other basic needs. The minimum saving rate should be in excess of 15%.

Too little has been done to identify the specific, low-cost intervention that will make a difference in economic growth. We have been trained to deal with throwing millions of dollars at these problems, which remain after centuries of welfare. In Uganda, only 1.4% of the annual budget of $1.8 billion is devoted to water supply and sanitation, while only 4.8% was allocated to energy.

Crop yields can be sharply increased and electricity can be extended to the villages. What is required is investment for sustained economic development on a large scale. This is not a relentless drive for one magic bullet that will turn the tide. It is an integrated solution involving available land, women farmers and their families, tree nursery supported by a Carbon Tax Fund, fertilizing from the fish rabbit farm, and irrigation and electricity from the HUG Energy System.0000Today's-Tall-Tree2


Tall-Trees2
 will take place near a water source and beside a school with added agricultural training and monitored by village field officers. The first stage is the Living Water MicroFinance Inc. support for women farmers, which is not a welfare handout, but a rotating system of micro loans, which is payable at the end of a harvest.  The second phase is the introduction of a tree nursery, which is supported by the Carbon Tax Fund. Continue reading AFRICAN POVERTY TRAP 2